Governor Jared Polis issued a directive clarifying that all Coloradans should now wear cloth masks for every trip outside the house. The CDC also issued similar recommendations for all Americans who plan to venture out in public. The change in recommendation comes after studies have shown that 25% of people with COVID-19 have no symptoms. Studies have shown cloth masks — while likely not effective in keeping wearers safe from catching the virus —  they help prevent people with COVID-19 from spreading it, especially for those that don’t know they have it.  

While the masks should not be medical masks like the N95 version needed for medical healthcare professionals, they can be as simple as an old shirt or bandana tied with a hair rubber band, although even rubber bands are now in short supply. Enter a team of local fashion designers and artists who have shifted focus and are now hard at work to supply people with the masks they need to stay safe during this pandemic. Below, 303 Magazine put together a list of local creatives who are currently making masks for purchase. Each can be contacted for more information through the link provided.

Photo courtesy of Winter Session

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s website here.

The Lowdown: These well-known Denver accessories designers are offering reusable, cotton face masks with flexible wire nose pieces and sleeves for removable filters. Each mask will ship with two disposable filters and additional filters can be purchased after April 10. For every mask purchased, one mask will be donated to a health care provider through Winter Session’s new non-profit, the Cover Up Colorado initiative. Masks start at $14.

Photo courtesy of Project BODOmask.

How to buy it: To order, send a direct message to the organization’s Instagram page here.

The Lowdown: In partnership, local designer, Sarah Choi, and artist, DINKC, are taking their love for art and fashion and directing it toward relief with hand-sewn protective masks made from heat-pressed vinyl scraps from previous clothing designs. Each custom mask is double-layered, reusable and comes with a filtered pouch and filter. For every sale, Project BODOmask will donate a mask to someone in need. Prices vary.

Photo courtesy of Mona Lucero on Facebook.

How to buy it: To order, send a direct message to the designer’s Instagram page here.

The Lowdown: As a veteran fashion designer in Denver, Lucero has made herself an indispensable piece of the local fabric. She has now turned her creative direction toward making cloth masks for both adults and children. Orders will start going out this Thursday. Masks start at $22.

Governor Jared Polis wearing a Phunkshun. Photo courtesy of Phunkshun.

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s website here

The Lowdown: This local winter facemask manufacturer has shifted its operation to make personal hygiene masks to keep the public safe. Masks are made from a polyester/spandex blend of fabric, with the inner lining of moisture-wicking antimicrobial mesh that inhibits the growth bacteria. For every mask sold to the public, Phunkshun will donate one to the State of Colorado to be dispersed to individuals in need.

Photo courtesy of Cha Cha Romero.

How to buy it: To order, email [email protected]

The Lowdown: As a registered emergency room nurse, makeup artist and designer, Cha Cha Romero has intimate knowledge of the exact needs the community has to stay safe for necessary trips out of the house. Two months ago, she created The Mask Making Mafia to help the healthcare workers affected by the lack of supplies available, the effects of which have led to a small army of local designers and other creatives who are now producing masks for hospitals and the public.

Photo courtesy of Jasmine Lewis on Facebook.

How to buy it: To order, send a direct message to the designer’s Instagram page here.

The Lowdown: Lewis is offering 100% cotton masks in black and white, although she is accepting custom orders as well. A portion of all of the sales goes to making masks for Denver’s medical professionals.

Photo courtesy of DarkDenim.

How to buy it: To order, send a direct message to the designer’s Instagram page here.

The Lowdown:  This period in history may be local designer Aldo Olivarez’s darkest yet, as he has been cranking out protective coverings for the community for much of the quarantine period. Masks feature a variety of styles using repurposed fabric from brands like Supreme and Louis Vuitton, all with a signature spin Olivarez is known for. Prices vary.

 

Photo courtesy of Equillibrium.

How to buy it: To order, visit the designer’s website here.

The Lowdown:  Designer, Deb Henriksen, created washable and reuseable face masks made from 100% hemp and bamboo, both of which are celebrated for their natural anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties. Henriksen will donate 10% of all sales to sustainable initiatives throughout the community. Masks are $38 each.

Photo courtesy of Denver Fashion Truck on Facebook.

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s Facebook page here.

The Lowdown: Co-owner, Desiree Gallegos-Barragan, is sewing masks with double-layered cotton complete in a variety of patterns. The straps are jersey material for comfort and the mask has a pocket insert to add a filter layer. Masks start at $14.

Photo courtesy of Vander Jacket.

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s website here

The Lowdown: This Aurora-based running apparel company is offering water-resistant masks made from Supplex with a mesh interior. Each mask bears the company’s signature reflective material styled after the Red Cross logo. Masks are $15 and are shipped for free. 

Photo courtesy of Ola Cre Skin Care on Facebook.

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s Facebook page here

The Lowdown: This local, organic skincare company is making custom, washable masks with a hepa filter on the inside that can be removed. It is taking orders for adults and toddlers. Masks are $14.

Photo courtesy of Mama Llama on Instagram.

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s website here

The Lowdown: Mama Llama is making 100% cotton masks with flannel or fleece lining in a variety of patterns. Orders usually ship within three days. Masks are $10. 

Photo courtesy of Heritage & Bloom on Instagram.

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s Instagram page here

The Lowdown: As a way to thank healthcare providers, grocery store workers, delivery drivers and other essential workers, this small-batch accessory company is offering free masks to those in need. The program is built on the honor system and donations are welcomed to help cover the costs of supplies. 

Photo courtesy of Rose & Royce on Instagram.

How to buy it: To order, email 𝗖𝗿𝗲𝗮𝘁𝗲@𝗿𝗼𝘀𝗲𝗮𝗻𝗱𝗿𝗼𝘆𝗰𝗲.𝗰𝗼𝗺.

The Lowdown: This local, bohemian accessories brand is offering washable, 100% cotton masks in a variety of fabric patterns in limited quantities. Prices vary. 

Photo courtesy of Colorado Creative Co.

How to buy it: To order, visit the company’s Etsy page here

The Lowdown: Colorado Creative Co specializes in a variety of handmade products crafted in Denver using largely repurposed materials. It is currently offering face masks made out of high thread count, right weave cotton hand-dyed so each mask is unique. The masks are made in classic style, meaning they tie rather than use elastic to offer more flexibility. Masks are $13, which includes shipping. 

Photo courtesy of Foxlilie Studio on Instagram.

How to buy it: To order, visit the company’s website here.

The Lowdown: Made from sustainable and organic double-layer cotton fabrics, Foxlilie Studio’s cloth masks are designed to keep noses and mouths covered for any journey outside the house. For each mask sold, the company will donate one to someone in need. Masks come in three sizes and are $18 each. 

Photo courtesy of Moore Collection.

How to buy it: To order, visit the company’s website here.

The Lowdown: Created by high school sweethearts, Taylor and Tanner Barkin, this screenprinting business has transformed its workspace into a mask-making site. The reusable masks are made with two layers of heavyweight cotton and have an insert for a filter. Each mask is cut and sewn from repurposed t-shirt fabric. A portion of sales will be donated to Feed the Frontline Denver. Masks are $13. 

Photo courtesy of Prairie West on Instagram.

How to buy it: To order, visit the company’s site here.

The Lowdown: The Denver-based company is selling 100% woven cotton, repurposed fabric masks that have an insert pocket for a filter, removable flexible nose piece and string tie. Masks are $25 for two.

Photo courtesy of Lady Jane Clothing.

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s Facebook page here

The Lowdown: This Denver designer has created 100% cotton masks in a variety of fabric designs. For each mask sold, donations will be made to those in need. Masks are $20 with shipping and go directly to covering the cost for supplies for donated masks.  

Photo courtesy of B Fresh Gear.

 

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s website here

The Lowdown: Known for their ‘90s-inspired gear and lighthearted approach to life, the B Fresh Gear team has set their sights on stocking the community with hip masks that have as much personality as they do functionality. Masks are upcycled from upcycled bandanas from B Fresh’s partners, Rockmount Ranch Wear. All proceeds go to support Denver small businesses. Masks are $21.99 with free shipping. 

Angela R Garcia

Photo courtesy of Angela R Garcia.

How to buy it: To order, email the designer directly at [email protected]

The Lowdown: This local designer is making masks in three sizes to fit children as well as adults. Colors are gray, white, brown and purple, although you can supply your own fabric for a custom option. Prices vary and include delivery. 

Photo courtesy of Electric Dream Boutique on Instagram.

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s Instagram page here

The Lowdown: Boutique owner, Adrienne Scott-Trask, is cranking out two-layered, 100% cotton flannel masks in one size. Masks are $15 and include shipping. Each additional mask purchased is $12. 

Photo courtesy of Sara Gabriel on Facebook.

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s website here

The Lowdown: Sara Gabriel has created The Mask Project as a way to not only provide the public with necessary protection but to support the healthcare community as well. Personal masks are layered Egyptian cotton with a fully-encased nose wire and interior pocket for filters. Personal masks are $15. You can also purchase a sponsored medical mask for a healthcare professional in need for $16. Sponsored masks are made to the specifications required by hospitals and medical agencies and are delivered to local hospitals.

Photo courtesy of Hadden & Ev.

How to buy it: To order, visit the designer’s Etsy shop here

The Lowdown: Known for her artful illustrations on designer accessories, Hadden Bennett has also started making masks. Her goal is to make people happy and make things feel more normal by adding a touch of personal style to something that typically makes people feel uneasy. “I am all about mask fashion and believe they will play a huge part of everyday fashion for the foreseeable future. It’s just one small way people can take back control and feel empowered against COVID-19,” she said. The cotton, reusable face masks come in a variety of shapes and styles. Each mask has three layers, including a middle filter layer, and comes in sizes ranging from infant to men’s. Pricing depends on the style and size of the mask. Adult masks range from $10.60 to $17. Children’s masks range from $7.40 to $14.20. 

Photo courtesy of Luckyleo on Facebook.

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s website here

The Lowdown: Luckyleo is a female-founded company created by sisters, Chelsea Early and Heather Walker, who are retired professional ballerinas and now make dancewear. Due to the pandemic, the duo has switched to making masks and has already donated hundreds of masks. The washable, reusable masks feature two layers, the outer is stretchy fabric that allows for a closer fit and the inner is a soft cotton blend. All of the proceeds go toward production and supply of protective healthcare gear, and for every mask created, one will be donated to someone in need. Masks are $9.50. 

Photo courtesy of Amy Lisojo.

How to buy it: To order, message the designer through her Instagram account here

The Lowdown: Local streetwear designer, Amy Lisojo, is now creating cotton masks for adults and children. Her masks are made from the suggested cotton blend fabric with a liner that allows for a filter to be inserted. Her team will regularly have new masks available for drop off, pick up or next day shipping. Prices vary. 

Photo courtesy of Visual Impact by Design.

How to buy it: To order, email the designer directly at [email protected] 

The Lowdown: Visual Impact by Design is a small Colorado business that makes uniforms/costuming for high school and independent color guards in Colorado and nationally. Owner, Lisa Cowden, is now offering masks in a variety of sizes from children to adults. Each mask is made of three layers, two outside layers of 100% cotton with a third interior layer of 100% toweling material. The masks have ties and a pocket on the top of the mask with a wire piece in it to help shape the mask to your face. Masks are $10 each. 

Photo courtesy of Ink Monstr.

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s website here

The Lowdown: Local graphic design company, Ink Monstr, is creating moisture-wicking, double-layered masks in a breathable spandex blend. Masks start at $18 for two and can be ordered in bulk with custom print and logos as well. 

Photo courtesy of Culture Street.

How to buy it: To order, visit the brand’s website here

The Lowdown: Protective masks are now available from celebrated streetwear boutique, Culture Street. The reversible and washable masks are two layers of fabric and have a nose piece to form around your nose and provide a snug fit to your face. Masks are $15. 

Photo courtesy of Susan Dillon.

How to buy it: To order, email the designer directly at [email protected]

The Lowdown: Known for creating wearable art, local fiber and mixed media artist, Susan Dillon, has created contoured-style masks with stretch knit ties made from two layers of 100% cotton. Dillon is requesting a $15 donation to help cover the cost of the masks she donates to the Denver community and has donated more than 350 masks so far.  

Photo courtesy of Matilda Marginal.

How to buy it: To order, message the designer through her Instagram account here.

The Lowdown: For those looking for something more avant-garde, local designer, Matilda Marginal, has created a limited run of masks using repurposed materials from new women’s lingerie and quilted cotton. Although the designer describes these more like wearable art, the masks are fully functional and offer the necessary, protective barrier needed for excursions outside the home. Masks are $50.